Working From Home Tips & Tricks

Working From Home Tips & Tricks

There are now more people than ever working from home. For those not included in the 7% of US workers who were working from home before COVID-19, I’m sure you’re learning that it can take some getting used to. It is important to take preventative steps in your home office setup to prevent common injuries and boost morale. Below are some Home Ergonomic Tips & Tricks that will help you stay healthy while working from your new home office. And remember if you have to go out in public, be sure to protect yourself and others from COVID-19.

Working From Home Ergonomic Tips & Tricks

Provided By: Higginbotham

Working from home comes with its own set of challenges. If an employee finds themselves working from home for a prolonged period of time, it is especially important to take steps to prevent ergonomic injuries. Taking small steps can go a long way to injury prevention at home.

Healthy at Home

Ergonomics is defined as the science of fitting a workspace to an individual’s needs. Ergonomics aims to increase efficiency and productivity while reducing discomfort and the likelihood of injury.

Many factors of ergonomics may be taken for granted in the workplace and be severely lacking in a home environment. For example, while at the office, you likely have access to a suitable desk and chair, but when you work from home, you might not have an ideal setup.

Poor ergonomics can lead to not only reduced employee efficiency, but also a number of health issues that may have long-lasting effects, including damage to muscles, nerves, blood vessels, ligaments and tendons. Musculoskeletal disorders can be caused by a wide variety of tasks, many of which may seem innocent, such as sitting with poor posture or having to bend or reach repeatedly.

Workstation Considerations

In order to make your home a suitable work environment, there are a number of factors that you should consider for your workspace, including your:

  • Chair—A sturdy chair that supports the curvature of the spine is ideal for working. Chairs should also allow for adjustments so that your feet can rest flat on the floor and your thighs are parallel to it. While typing, your arms should be parallel to the floor as well.
  • Desk—Use a work surface, such as a desk or table, that has space underneath for your legs and feet. If a work surface is too low, adjust your chair accordingly. The situation may also be able to be corrected using sturdy supports to boost the legs of either the work surface or the chair. Cushion your wrists from the surface edge with padding or a wrist rest.
  • Screen—Arrange your laptop or monitor screen directly in front of you and approximately an arm’s length away with the top of the screen at, or slightly below, eye level.
  • Layout—Organize files and materials so that you don’t have to constantly bend and strain to reach them.
  • Equipment—When using a keyboard and mouse, keep them on the same surface. Position your arms so that your hands are aligned with, or slightly below, your elbows. Make sure your wrists are straight and your upper arms stay close to your body. If you use the phone frequently, put it on speaker or use a headset in order to avoid having to cradle the phone between your head and shoulder.
Preventing Hazards

In addition to arranging your workspace properly, you should also be aware of new risk factors that may be present. Be careful not to overload electrical outlets or create tripping hazards with power strips or extension cords running across the floor of your home.

Taking Breaks

Even while at the office, employees shouldn’t spend eight straight hours sitting at their desks. This applies to working at home as well. Take regular breaks to stand, stretch and move around a bit.

In Conclusion

Working from home has its pros and cons. While your home may not be the ideal work environment, utilizing the strategies in this article can go a long way toward preventing unnecessary injuries.

 

#WorkingFromHome #Powerhouse #PeopleProcessTechnology #COVID19

Protect Yourself and Others from COVID-19

Protect Yourself and Others from COVID-19

As an essential business, we have to stay up-to-date on all of the latest CDC recommendations for protecting ourselves and others from the threat of contracting COVID-19. There are many tips and tricks out there, and we’re here to share some more with you in case you’ve missed them. We also want to reassure those reading that these are the precautions Powerhouse and our employees are taking everyday during these uncertain times.

Click here to find all this information on CDC.gov

Know How it Spreads

  • There is currently no vaccine to prevent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).
  • The best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to this virus.
  • The virus is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person.
      • Between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet).
      • Through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes.
  • These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs.

Take Steps to Protect Yourself

   Clean Your Hands Often

Protect Yourself and Others from COVID-19 1

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds especially after you have been in a public place, or after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.
  • If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
Avoid Close Contact

Protect Yourself and Others from COVID-19 2

Take Steps to Protect Others

Stay Home if You’re Sick

Protect Yourself and Others from COVID-19 3

Cover Coughs and Sneezes

Protect Yourself and Others from COVID-19 4

  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow.
  • Throw used tissues in the trash.
  • Immediately wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not readily available, clean your hands with a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.
Wear a Facemask if You’re Sick

Protect Yourself and Others from COVID-19 5

  • If you are sick: You should wear a facemask when you are around other people (e.g., sharing a room or vehicle) and before you enter a healthcare provider’s office. If you are not able to wear a facemask (for example, because it causes trouble breathing), then you should do your best to cover your coughs and sneezes, and people who are caring for you should wear a facemask if they enter your room. Learn what to do if you are sick.
  • If you are NOT sick: You do not need to wear a facemask unless you are caring for someone who is sick (and they are not able to wear a facemask). Facemasks may be in short supply and they should be saved for caregivers.
Clean and Disinfect

Protect Yourself and Others from COVID-19 6

  • Clean AND disinfect frequently touched surfaces daily. This includes tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, and sinks.
  • If surfaces are dirty, clean them: Use detergent or soap and water prior to disinfection.

 

 

Click here to learn how to disinfect properly.

#Powerhouse #Coronavirus #COVID-19 #ProtectYourself

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus
COVID-19 Changes Everything

COVID-19 Changes Everything

In this quickly changing environment, Powerhouse is your solution to protecting employees, customers, and the general public.  For many of our customers, we’ve moved from plan to execution in a matter of days in response to OSHA and CDC safety recommendations.  We understand that everyone’s health and safety is the highest priority while we act with a sense of urgency ensuring initiatives are completed as quickly as possible.

OSHA and the CDC are recommending installing engineering controls that involve isolating employees from work-related hazards.

These types of controls reduce exposure to hazards without relying on worker behavior and can be the most cost-effective solution to implement.

COVID-19 Changes Everything 7

Engineering controls for SARS-CoV-2 include:

  • Installing high-efficiency air filters.
  • Increasing ventilation rates in the work environment.
  • Installing physical barriers, such as clear plastic sneeze guards.

Guidance on Preparing Workplaces for COVID-19:

  • Installing a drive-through window for customer service.
  • Specialized negative pressure ventilation in some settings, such as for aerosol generating procedures (e.g., airborne infection isolation rooms in healthcare settings).
  • Installing kick plates and hands-free openers
  • Store Front Board-ups
  • Dark Property Security Protocols

We can respond to your urgent Facility Maintenance and Exterior Services needs, COVID-19 Changes Everything 8as well as other COVID-19 cleaning related needs.

Click here to contact us now so we can help you

Source: OSHA’s Guidance on Preparing Workplaces for COVID-19

 

#Powerhouse #covid19 #sneezeguards #coronavirus #solutions #PeopleProcessTechnology #barriers #thereforyou

For Our Employees – COVID-19 Assistance

For Our Employees – COVID-19 Assistance

Dear Employees –

Powerhouse Foundation has established an emergency grant fund for Powerhouse employees who are facing financial hardship as a result of the coronavirus pandemic.

CLICK HERE FOR AN APPLICATION

Eligibility: The fund is open to applications from individuals who were employed by Powerhouse as of March 15, 2020.
Programs: Powerhouse Foundation is providing financial support for food assistance and emergency needs.
Deadline: Grants will be paid out from March 27th until funds are exhausted.
Application: To apply for a grant, you must complete the application by clicking the link above or below.

CLICK HERE FOR AN APPLICATION

Also be aware of the new stimulus package and what it means for you – click here to learn more.

Are you looking for counseling?

Let us introduce you to The Fountains Counseling Center. Reach out to them directly (INFO@TFFCOUNSELING.COM) or us (POWERHOUSEFOUNDATION@POWERHOUSENOW.COM) for an introduction.

Other possible resources for assistance:
  • Community Storehouse – 817-431-3340 Keller ISD and NW ISD areas including Colleyville, Fort Worth, Haltom City, Haslet, Justin, NRH, Roanoke, Southlake, Watauga, Westlake, and all the city of Keller.
  • Open Door Ministries
  • Christian Community Assistance
  • House of Hope – Crowley
  • Harvest House – Burleson
  • Community Enrichment Center, Inc. – 817-281-1164 – (76006, 76021, 76022, 76034, 76039, 76040, 76051, 76053, 76054, 76092, 76095, 76099, 76103, 76111, 76112, 76117, 76118, 76120, 76131, 76137, 76148, 76155, 76179, 76182, 76244, 76248, 76262, 76299.)
  • Mission Arlington – 817-277-6620 – Arlington Area
  • Salvation Army – 817-377-1800 – Tarrant County
  • Community Action Partners Parks and Community Services – 817-871-5772
  • Battered Women’s Foundation – 817-427-0720
  • Christian Connection – 817-283-8746 – (76021, 76022, 76039, 76040)
  • NEED – 817-280-0286 for East and 817-759-1506 for West
  • Arlington Urban Ministries – 817-861-8585
  • Allen Community Outreach – 972-727-9131
  • Samaritan Inn/Collin County Care Center http://www.thesamaritaninn.org phone 972-542-5302
  • Community Action Partners – 972-219-HELP
  • Union Gospel Mission – 1321 East Lancaster Avenue | Fort Worth, TX 76102-6689 phone 817-339-2553
  • Joseph Storehouse – 4605 Denton Highway, Haltom City, TX 76117 phone 877-441-7248 – info@thejosephstorehouse.org
Questions?

If you have any additional questions please contact Powerhouse Foundation first by emailing PowerhouseFoundation@powerhousenow.com then call our Executive Director at 936-522-7779 (please be sure to leave a voicemail if no answer). We will get back with you as quickly as possible.

Powerhouse Foundation and Powerhouse Ownership

COVID-19 and Our Industry

COVID-19 and Our Industry

As the World Health Organization officially declares this virus a pandemic, there are many concerns across the globe regarding our well-being. Our personal and professional lives are shifting as we, as a country and as a planet, figure out how best to stay healthy, stop the spread and also continue contributing economically. This is the first crisis in our time of the age of technology which allows many employers to offer work-from-home setups. Only time will tell which initiatives have proven successful in stopping the spread and maintaining progress in our professional lives.

For our industry in particular, which has been experiencing growth amongst a few challenges in the recent years, the coronavirus poses a pretty sizeable threat – material availability. Read more below from Construction Best Practices on how COVID-19 can potentially impact our industry this year.

As reported by GlobeSt.com, which offers commercial real estate news, the coronavirus has made the certainty of construction cost projections rather murky. “The impact of the virus is impossible to predict with certainty, but any prolonged slowdown in Chinese or global economic and manufacturing activity is likely to have significant ramifications for construction costs,” according to the JLL 2020 Construction Outlook, as cited by GlobeSt.com.

 

The virus may also impact the availability of materials. Because roughly one-fourth to one-third of the construction products that builders use in the United States are sourced from China, a sustained slowdown in Chinese production can lead to material shortages in the United States and rises in material costs, JLL said.

 

But there may be a silver lining: Reduced construction activity due to virus containment efforts will result in a reduction in demand of materials, offsetting price pressure. However, “Without the ability to accurately forecast the impact of the virus, we have widened our materials price forecast to account for the uncertainty,” JLL added.

Source: https://www.bestconstructionpractices.com/2020/03/coronavirus-poised-to-cause-materials-shortage/